Sentencing and what it means

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In practical terms the sentencing means that I’m eligible to get outta here to a halfway house in the next few weeks or months. When it actually happens is a matter of the B.O.P. processing my paperwork and space available at the halfway house. Once I go there I’ll be allowed to get a new cellphone and computer and really go to work. I’ll need to work on our appeals and finish my book. My lawyer is here so that’ll be convenient for me for the first time since I’ve been locked-up with zero access to internet, law library and lawyer’s office. My book needs to get published so we have something to sell and to line-up speaking engagements, radio shows, etc. with.

Share gets to stay home and relatively free until we finish our appeals; a very important thing for both of us. If and when we win the appeals she and I get our convictions overturned (our records cleared) and all of our cash and stash and condo returned – and Share never has to spend another day in prison. We’re going for federal immunity from further prosecution for life as our goal. I already had state immunity for life because of my ordainment and my unique state license to marry people as a “Cannabis sacrament” Minister.

Part of the conditions of our “supervised release” (probation) is that Share and I get to re-open the THC Ministry, just zero use or possession of Cannabis for now, but we DO get to appeal that restriction almost immediately based on religious freedom and we will hopefully win it soon. Remember, the judge already ruled that we were “legitimate” and “sincere” religious users of Cannabis. We want to be legally allowed to grow and use personal amounts of Cannabis while we appeal our case which might take a year or more.

We had to give-in a little by pleading ‘conditionally guilty’ in order to eventually get a lot when we win our appeals. That’s the BIG prize we’re after.

All the best to you,

Roger

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3 Responses to “Sentencing and what it means”


  1. Paul J. von Hartmann
    on May 7th, 2014
    @ 10:12 pm

    Being judged ‘conditionally guilty’ in court is like being found “sorta pregnant” by a doctor.

    In reality reality (as opposed to “political reality”), confessions extracted under conditions of coercion are invalid.

    Keep in mind that Roger’s religious defense was disallowed even after his ministry was found to be sincere and legitimate by the judge, and more importantly, by his Big Island community, whom he served for almost ten years before being arrested and imprisoned without trial or bail.


  2. Sister Lilli
    on May 19th, 2014
    @ 3:56 am

    Our RESPECTS, LOVE, AND PRAYERS FOR YOU ALL. WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO READING YOUR BOOK ROGER. GOD BLESS YOU AND YOURS ABUNDANTLY. WE HAVE REALLY MISSED YOU AND YOUR INSPIRATIONAL POSTS.

    HIGHEST REGARDS
    TOM AND LILLI


  3. Rev Adrian
    on May 22nd, 2014
    @ 11:25 pm

    Praying for you guys. Newly ordained minister, and fellow cannabis sacrament believer and user. You will overcome! We will overcome! Love, Peace, and Cannabis… Be Blessed

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